Turkey Free Trade Agreements

The agreement contains provisions for trade remedies (Articles 2.17 to 2.19), i.e. subsidies and countervailing measures, anti-dumping and global safeguard measures on the basis of relevant WTO agreements. This page lists the free trade agreements signed by Turkey. [1] In 1995, Turkey signed a customs union with the European Union for products other than agricultural products and services. Since 2018, the EU has been Turkey`s main trading partner, with 50% of its exports and 36% of its imports. [2] Describes the bilateral and multilateral trade agreements to which that country belongs, including with the United States. Includes websites and other resources that allow U.S. companies to get more information about how they can use these agreements. Turkey negotiates and concludes free trade agreements with third countries in parallel with the global trend towards free trade agreements and its commitment to the customs union. Under the EU common tariff, preferential trade regimes are the most important part of trade policy towards third countries.

One of the objectives of the agreement (Article 1) is to promote the harmonious development of economic relations between the contracting parties by extending mutual trade. The agreement contains provisions relating to the elimination of tariffs and other trade barriers, as well as other trade-related disciplines, such as competition rules, intellectual property protection, public procurement, state monopolies, state aid, payments and transfers. A joint committee was established to oversee the agreement. In December 2016, the Commission proposed modernising the customs union and extending bilateral trade relations to areas such as services, public procurement and sustainable development. The Commission`s proposal was based on extensive preparatory work during 2016, including a public consultation with stakeholders, a detailed impact assessment and a study by an external consultant. However, the Council has not yet adopted the mandate. Turkey, a party to the 1947 General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO) since 1995, implements free trade agreements in accordance with Article XXIV of the 1947 GATT. Under this article, Turkey could give its trading partners more favourable treatment within the framework of a customs union or free trade area, without extending this treatment to all WTO members, subject to certain conditions.

The following agreements have been replaced by the EU-Turkey customs union: Chapter 3 closely follows the approach of the WTO General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS). It covers trade in all service sectors under the four types of supply. Separate annexes on the recognition of service provider qualifications (Annex X), the free movement of individuals providing services (Annex XI), e-commerce (Annex XIII), telecommunications services (Annex XVI), co-productions (annex XV), financial services (Annex XVI), health services (Annex XVII), tourism and travel services (Annex XVII) and international road and logistics transport services (Annex XIX) complete the chapter with additional disciplines specific to these sectors. The lists of contracting parties with specific obligations and derogations from the treatment of the most favoured nation (MPF) are listed in AppendixES XII and IX respectively. These lists are subject to regular revision to further liberalize the exchange of services between the two parties. Turkey is a member of the Euro-Mediterranean Partnership (Euromed) and should therefore conclude free trade agreements with all other Mediterranean partners in order to create a Euro-Mediterranean free trade area. With regard to eFTA-Turkey trade statistics, see EFTA`s trade statistics tool in Chapter 6, the parties acknowledge that anti-competitive trade practices can undermine the benefits of liberalization resulting from the agreement.